Online Event

Textiles Summer School 2022
“Weaving the future” Online Lecture Series

Japanese Jacquard skills and materials knowledge meet e-textiles

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  • #Online Event

A summer school will be held this summer to explore new possibilities in textiles.
"Textiles Summer School" is an ongoing collaborative project involving designers, textile engineers, textile producers, and material scientists. This year's theme is "Japanese-style Jacquard" and "e-textiles", and we invite experts from Japan and abroad to give online lectures to explore new possibilities of textiles from various perspectives such as sustainability, luxury, material research, and speculative design. The lectures will be held on the theme of "Textiles and the Future of Textiles.

Mon, August 22, 2022 – Mon, October 10, 2022  UTC+09:00

18:30 – 20:00 every Monday in Japan time

Online Session

JPY 25,000 (incl. tax) / 1 person English interpretation will be provided for Japanese lectures.

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WHAT is the TSS 2022 ?

The Textiles Summer School (TSS) is an ongoing collaborative project involving national and international designers, textile engineers, textile producers and materials scientists from Japan and overseas.

TSS 2022 is organised by a committee of volunteer members from different disciplines and will consist of two parts – the first an  online lecture series by leading international  textiles and materials practicioners, open to all. The second part will be a hybrid online/physical workshop held in collaboration with designers, research centres and businesses involved in the textile industry in Japan and internationally.
(*This project is supported  by a grant from the Pola Art Foundation)

*This page contains details of the online lecture series. Please click here for information on the workshop.

THEME

TSS2022 will explore new possibilities of textiles from a materials standpoint, with a focus on ‘Japanese Jacquard Weaving’ and its potential for the creation of  ‘e-textiles’ or experimental textile works.

Eight online lectures will be held as an intensive, interactive learning programme. Japanese and international practitioners will present subjects related to the overall theme from a variety of perspectives embracing sustainability, the luxury market, materials research and speculative design and  e-textiles. Open to all on payment of a fee.

The Unique Characteristics of the Japanese Jacquard

Background

Until the introduction of the European Jacquard loom in the Meiji Period, Japanese looms and weaving practice were based on the narrow-width cloth required for the production of kimono and obi. They could not produce the broader fabric widths required for the international market. For the European Jacquard loom, fabric width, multiple repeats, speed and optimisation of weaving, along with reduction of costs were of key importance. In Japan, the ability to produce intricate weave patterns with minimal repeats over a 40cmsurface on a loom, which could physically fit into the limited spaces of a highly specialised cottage industry were the prime considerations.
Thus, the Japanese Jacquard developed as a context-specific hybrid, which operated on the same basic principles as the European Jacquard but which integrated Dobby and other mechanisms such as the botou and fumise. These allowed a wide vocabulary of specific weave techniques and yarn processes to be innovated whilst retaining traditional methods of pattern drafting. By bringing together the advantageous aspects of both systems, it allows a degree of customisation and scaling up or down depending on circumstances not possible in Western Jacquards. It is why it has become a focus of interest for experimentation among textile designers and artists in Japan today.

Some Japanese Jacquard Advantages for Experimentation

A variety of yarns can be used on the shuttle loom, including high-twist yarns, relatively thick yarns and specialist hybrid yarns like the tape yarns created by Tamiya Raden from finely sliced abalone on washi paper. Experimental yarns of this type, in which material commonly not used for weaving is blended or spun with a yarn component, open new avenues for textile designers.
The weft yarns are not automatically cut on both sides as in the Western Jacquard, but remain connected in a single line until the end of the shuttle tube. This factor and the ability to use thicker yarns than a Western Jacquard enable the use of conductive yarns, the creation of seamless looped fabric for whole garment production as well as multi-layered fabric – degrees of customisation and innovation vital to the development of new fabrics, particularly for the luxury market. This has made the Japanese Jacquard a focus of interest to those involved in the emerging areas of e-textiles and sustainable textiles.

Intelligent Textiles(e-textiles + Smart textiles)

Smart textiles can be defined as textiles that are able to sense and respond to changes in their environment. They may be divided into two classes: passive and active smart textiles Passive smart textiles, which are sensors and can only sense the environment; Active smart textiles, which can sense stimuli from the environment and also react to them; simultaneously with the sensor function, they also play an actuator role; Very smart textiles, which are able to adapt their behaviour to the circumstances.

Koncar, V. 2016. Smart Textiles and their Applications. Woodhead Publishing.

Intelligent textiles can be defined as those that have specific properties generated through the choice of yarn/material, spinning and weave process and the fabric’s subsequent treatment. Chrimen (silk crepe) is one such traditional example.

Online  Lecture Series

The eight online lectures are designed to be an intensive, interactive learning programme for those interested in the subject from a general interest or specialist viewpoint. Leading  Japanese and international practitioners will present textiles from a variety of perspectives embracing sustainability, the challenges of tradition, the  luxury market, materials research,  speculative design and e-textiles.

  • Date: 22 Aug – 10 Oct 2022, every Monday from 18:30 – 20:00 in Japan time.
  • Price: JPY 25,000 (incl. tax) / 1 person
    • Please register and make payment at the ticket purchase site “Peatix”. Various credit cards are accepted. (*Please click here for information on credit cards accepted.)

Notes

  • The price is inclusive of all eight lectures with no offer for individual lectures..
  • Lectures will be delivered via Zoom webinar.
  • Lectures  will be delivered either in English with Japanese subtitles or in Japanese with English subtitles. Translation will be provided for the Q & A sessions.
  • A limited time archive will be available for participants via Youtube.

Schedule

Aug. 22 Weaving leapfrog:
The western jacquard loom and experimental practice
Jane Landau In this presentation Jane Landau will look at woven structures that use binding warps such as Lampas, Taqueté and Samit, how and where I first came across them, how these structures influence my work and their relevance to the Textiles Summer School theme of the Japanese Jacquard loom.
Aug. 29 Japanese Jacquard looms and silk materials:
Their uniqueness and potential for experimental use with e-textiles and new materials
Dr. Kaori Ueda The Japanese Jacquard loom and silk yarn evolved uniquely for the Japanese context and is still used mainly for weaving kimono or obi. This presentation will show how the hybrid Japanese Jacquard loom differs in terms of structure, use and potential from the Western Jacquard loom. Like the looms themselves, the silk yarns used for obi and kimono have also evolved in their own unique way. From the viewpoint of design, this lecture will introduce the unique features of the Japanese Jacquard looms and silk materials and their contemporary possibilities for experimental use with new materials or in e-textiles.
Sep. 5 Sensory Pleasure:
Sustainable hacking of textile traditions
Shioka Okamoto The presentation centres on her collaboration with the Usui Orimono weaving mill, in Kyotango which specializes in polyester chirimen crepe. The aim of this project has been to transform the by-products of loom waste and bring new value to it. A digital laser cutter was applied to the pre-scoured polyester Chirimen surface which was then processed to produce a new material textile form. The designer will address the material challenges, design development and technical experiments that led to prototype completion.
Sep. 12 Wearables Design in a Planetary Age Kawasaki Kazuya How can wearables design can be a critical medium between the human and natural / built environment in a future of post-human entities?
Sep. 19 Weaving Futures Holly McQuillan In this presentation Dr Holly McQuillan will share her work on multimorphic textile-forms and the prototyping, design and conceptual strategies needed for the woven textile-based forms of the future.
Sep. 26 “Weaving the future” from the perspectives of two Japanese weaving firms with a traditional and contemporary focus Hiroyuki Katsura & Koji Tamiya In this presentation, Hiroyuki Katsura of Katsura Kigyo, which manufactures fabrics for Buddhist vestments in Nishijin,Kyoto and Kyouji Tamiya of Tamiya Raden, which manufactures mother-of-pearl inlay fabrics and innovative new ones for the international luxury market in Tango, will introduce the history of their companies and their weaving practice. They will also talk about the future of Nishijin textiles – their long-term and short- term visions from their respective perspectives.
Oct. 3 Woven compositions:
How to use the loom to engineer textile structures
Milou Voorwinden By understanding the unique qualities and limitations of jacquard looms, the inherent material properties of yarns and weaving techniques can be used to engineer fabric structures. In this presentation, Milou Voorwinden will introduce her methods on experimenting with jacquard looms to create
three-dimentional woven textiles.
Oct.10 Soft Systems:
Smart surfaces, structures and digital assemblies
Sara Robertson The presentation will show a range of work by designers who have specialized in Soft Systems as part of the MA Textiles programme at the Royal College of Art since 2017 and explore how they have designed for future softer/smarter material systems and products.  The talk will highlight different ways of thinking for smart textile design and systems and how this could impact on future approaches and design in this area.

 CONTACT

If you have any questions about this event, please send an email to the following address. (Contact: Kinoshita, Iida)
info.mtrl@loftwork.com

  • With a grant from

    Pola Art Foundation

GUEST LECTURES

  • Jane Landau

    Textile Designer

    Jane divides her time between teaching at the Royal College of Art (RCA) and running her own studio in London. Her interest in weaving began as a student at Camberwell School of Art. After graduation, she honed her skills at L’ANAT (l’Atelier National d’Art Textile) and taught for 25 years at l’Ensci (l’École Nationale Supérieure de Création Industrielle), while setting up her own workshop, producing one-off scarves and accessories for the collectors’ market.

    Moving back to the UK, she taught at Winchester School of Art for 6 years and is now the specialist weave technician at the RCA and an associate lecturer at Central Saint Martins UAL..She design collections of samples for Dash & Miller and works on special commissions.
     https://www.janelandau.com/

    Jane divides her time between teaching at the Royal College of Art (RCA) and running her own studio in London. Her interest in weaving began as a student at Camberwell School of Art. After graduation, she honed her skills at L’ANAT (l’Atelier National d’Art Textile) and taught for 25 years at l’Ensci (l’École Nationale Supérieure de Création Industrielle), while setting up her own workshop, producing one-off scarves and accessories for the collectors’ market.

    Moving back to the UK, she taught at Winchester School of Art for 6 years and is now the specialist weave technician at the RCA and an associate lecturer at Central Saint Martins UAL..She design collections of samples for Dash & Miller and works on special commissions.
     https://www.janelandau.com/

  • Milou Voorwinden

    Designer

    Milou Voorwinden is a woven textile designer based in the Netherlands. She graduated from the product design department of ArtEZ University of Arts in Arnhem in 2016 and is currently a MA student in Design research at Willem de Kooning Academy. Voorwinden runs her own textile design and research studio, works as a researcher at the TU Delft and is a product developer at the TextileLab in Tilburg.
    She specializes in weaving three-dimensional structures and one-piece woven products on the loom. Voorwinden is inspired by traditional weaving techniques and aims to rediscover, renew and apply the techniques in an innovative way using contemporary digital tools.
    www.milouvoorwinden.com

    Milou Voorwinden is a woven textile designer based in the Netherlands. She graduated from the product design department of ArtEZ University of Arts in Arnhem in 2016 and is currently a MA student in Design research at Willem de Kooning Academy. Voorwinden runs her own textile design and research studio, works as a researcher at the TU Delft and is a product developer at the TextileLab in Tilburg.
    She specializes in weaving three-dimensional structures and one-piece woven products on the loom. Voorwinden is inspired by traditional weaving techniques and aims to rediscover, renew and apply the techniques in an innovative way using contemporary digital tools.
    www.milouvoorwinden.com

  • Kazuya Kawasaki

    Synflux CEO
    Speculative Fashion Designer, Design Researcher

    Kazuya is a trans-disciplinary designer whose projects look at fashion design on a broad spectrum, from material development to design process in order to create works that speculate on an alternative future of post-human bodies where fashion design can be a critical medium between the human and the natural / built environment. His awards include the Global Change Award by H&M Foundation, Japan Media Art Festival: Art Division, Dezeen Design Award Longlist, YouFab Global Creative Award 2017, Wired Creative Hack Award 2017 and STARTS Prize 2017. He was selected for Forbes Japan 30 under 30、 WWD JAPAN NEXT LEADERS, the top 20 global design graduates by Dutch Design Week, World Design Event and Design Indaba, and was nominated for one of the “Tech-Skin Innovators” for Future Innovator Summit Tokyo 2018 by the Ars Electronica Tokyo Initiative. Recently he has been a lecturer at Waseda University and a member of the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry’s Future of Fashion Study Group. He is the supervisor and one of the co-author of the book “SPECULATIONS (BNN publisher, 2019)” and “Fashion Studies (Filmart publisher, 2022)”.
    https://www.synflux.io/jp

    [ Photo: Keita Maruyama ]

    Kazuya is a trans-disciplinary designer whose projects look at fashion design on a broad spectrum, from material development to design process in order to create works that speculate on an alternative future of post-human bodies where fashion design can be a critical medium between the human and the natural / built environment. His awards include the Global Change Award by H&M Foundation, Japan Media Art Festival: Art Division, Dezeen Design Award Longlist, YouFab Global Creative Award 2017, Wired Creative Hack Award 2017 and STARTS Prize 2017. He was selected for Forbes Japan 30 under 30、 WWD JAPAN NEXT LEADERS, the top 20 global design graduates by Dutch Design Week, World Design Event and Design Indaba, and was nominated for one of the “Tech-Skin Innovators” for Future Innovator Summit Tokyo 2018 by the Ars Electronica Tokyo Initiative. Recently he has been a lecturer at Waseda University and a member of the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry’s Future of Fashion Study Group. He is the supervisor and one of the co-author of the book “SPECULATIONS (BNN publisher, 2019)” and “Fashion Studies (Filmart publisher, 2022)”.
    https://www.synflux.io/jp

    [ Photo: Keita Maruyama ]

  • Holly McQuillan

    TU Delft
    Assistant Professor on Multimorphic Textile Systems

    Dr Holly McQuillan is Assistant Professor in Multimorphic Textile Systems the Materialising Futures section at the Sustainable Design Engineering department at TU Delft, Netherlands. Holly has 18 years experience researching, writing, consulting and designing in the field of sustainable fashion and textiles and is the co-author of Zero Waste Fashion Design and a number of book chapters, exhibitions and academic articles. Her current research on Multimorphic Textile Systems explores the design and development of complex interconnected fibre-yarn-textile-form systems as a means for transforming how we design manufacture, use, and recover textile-based forms. Holly’s work encompasses the design and fabrication of animated textiles for new manufacturing and use cases, methods for the automation of on-demand production of woven textile-based form and design for circular transitions.
    www.tudelft.nl
    www.hollymcquillan.com
    www.criticaltextiletopologies.com

    [ Photo: Simon Forsythe ]

    Dr Holly McQuillan is Assistant Professor in Multimorphic Textile Systems the Materialising Futures section at the Sustainable Design Engineering department at TU Delft, Netherlands. Holly has 18 years experience researching, writing, consulting and designing in the field of sustainable fashion and textiles and is the co-author of Zero Waste Fashion Design and a number of book chapters, exhibitions and academic articles. Her current research on Multimorphic Textile Systems explores the design and development of complex interconnected fibre-yarn-textile-form systems as a means for transforming how we design manufacture, use, and recover textile-based forms. Holly’s work encompasses the design and fabrication of animated textiles for new manufacturing and use cases, methods for the automation of on-demand production of woven textile-based form and design for circular transitions.
    www.tudelft.nl
    www.hollymcquillan.com
    www.criticaltextiletopologies.com

    [ Photo: Simon Forsythe ]
  • Sara Robertson

    Smart Textile Designer

    Dr Sara Robertson is Tutor (Research) in Smart Textiles on the MA Textiles Programme at the RCA and leads the specialism Soft Systems. She also runs a business Sara + Sarah Smart Textile Design with long standing collaborator Sarah Taylor. Their work focusses on transforming textile properties through existing manufacturing capability within the UK. We work with the aesthetic, material and programmable properties of smart textiles and explore markets and creative opportunities for their use beyond wearables. Working closely with MYB Textiles a world leading lace manufacturer based in Scotland they have developed large scale light emitting lace and a prototype control interface for theatre and performance industries.
    https://www.rca.ac.uk/more/staff/dr-sara-robertson/

    Dr Sara Robertson is Tutor (Research) in Smart Textiles on the MA Textiles Programme at the RCA and leads the specialism Soft Systems. She also runs a business Sara + Sarah Smart Textile Design with long standing collaborator Sarah Taylor. Their work focusses on transforming textile properties through existing manufacturing capability within the UK. We work with the aesthetic, material and programmable properties of smart textiles and explore markets and creative opportunities for their use beyond wearables. Working closely with MYB Textiles a world leading lace manufacturer based in Scotland they have developed large scale light emitting lace and a prototype control interface for theatre and performance industries.
    https://www.rca.ac.uk/more/staff/dr-sara-robertson/

  • Hiroyuki Katsura

    President of Katsura-Kigyou Ten

    The current Katsura Kigyo Shop was founded in 1979. The Katsura family had been involved in weaving gold brocade for at least three generations before Hiroyuki Katsura took over the family business in 1987 after working as a machine designer at Towa Seimitsu Kogyo Co. Currently, he specialises in hand-woven  gold brocade for religious purposes. Gold brocade of this type includes kesa (robes), mizuhiki (watermarks) and other decorative fabrics related to Buddhism or the Noh Theatre in general.

    *About Nishijin Gold Brocade
    A fabric made of twill or satin with a pattern woven into it using gold thread. Used for Buddhist robes, Noh costumes, obi (kimono sash), sackcloth, outer garments, etc. It is characterised by a wider weave width than obi. About 10% of the companies in the Nishijin Textile Industry Association are engaged in gold brocade.

     

    The current Katsura Kigyo Shop was founded in 1979. The Katsura family had been involved in weaving gold brocade for at least three generations before Hiroyuki Katsura took over the family business in 1987 after working as a machine designer at Towa Seimitsu Kogyo Co. Currently, he specialises in hand-woven  gold brocade for religious purposes. Gold brocade of this type includes kesa (robes), mizuhiki (watermarks) and other decorative fabrics related to Buddhism or the Noh Theatre in general.

    *About Nishijin Gold Brocade
    A fabric made of twill or satin with a pattern woven into it using gold thread. Used for Buddhist robes, Noh costumes, obi (kimono sash), sackcloth, outer garments, etc. It is characterised by a wider weave width than obi. About 10% of the companies in the Nishijin Textile Industry Association are engaged in gold brocade.

     

  • Kyoji Tamiya  

    President of Tamiya Raden

    Kyoji Tamiya  has been involved in the family kimono business, Tamiya Orimono, founded by his father Kyori Tamiya since 1969. In 2006, he promoted the mother-of-pearl inlay silk fabric developed by the company as a luxury fabric to the world’s top brands.

    In 2011, the fabric width was broadened and exhibited at the Première Vision in Paris. The company continues to work with luxury brands each year. An obi with mother-of-pearl woven at the same time was presented to the Empress of Japan. In 2015, he established Tamiya Raden Co.. The company has been actively collaborating with designers and creators, and has developed new fabrics such as leather silk and wood textiles applying raden weave through these exchanges.

    *About Tamiya Raden
    ‘Weaving the radiance of the sea’
    This weaving workshop has been producing Raden weave craft belts made from the mother-of-pearl layer of seashells for over 40 years. The aim is to develop new creations using inspiration from nature and traditional techniques. In recent years, the company has received offers from international high-end brands as a textile material. We strive to produce products with originality as our motto.
    https://tamiyaraden.com/

    Kyoji Tamiya  has been involved in the family kimono business, Tamiya Orimono, founded by his father Kyori Tamiya since 1969. In 2006, he promoted the mother-of-pearl inlay silk fabric developed by the company as a luxury fabric to the world’s top brands.

    In 2011, the fabric width was broadened and exhibited at the Première Vision in Paris. The company continues to work with luxury brands each year. An obi with mother-of-pearl woven at the same time was presented to the Empress of Japan. In 2015, he established Tamiya Raden Co.. The company has been actively collaborating with designers and creators, and has developed new fabrics such as leather silk and wood textiles applying raden weave through these exchanges.

    *About Tamiya Raden
    ‘Weaving the radiance of the sea’
    This weaving workshop has been producing Raden weave craft belts made from the mother-of-pearl layer of seashells for over 40 years. The aim is to develop new creations using inspiration from nature and traditional techniques. In recent years, the company has received offers from international high-end brands as a textile material. We strive to produce products with originality as our motto.
    https://tamiyaraden.com/

  • Shioka Okamoto

    Textile Designer

    Shioka Okamoto specializes in research and production in textile design. She graduated from Tama Art University with a major in textile design in 2013 and moved to Europe, where she graduated from Chelsea College of Arts Graduate Diploma Interior Design in 2014 and completed Royal Danish Academy MA Textile Design in 2016. Since 2017, she has been working as an assistant professor at the Faculty of Design, Okayama Prefectural University. She has been working on creating works inspired by existing spaces and places, participating in group exhibitions in Japan and abroad, and presenting her works in solo exhibitions. In her collaborative research “Sensory Pleasure” with Usui Orimono Co., Ltd. she has developed a textile design that makes effective use of discarded polyester crepe.
    http://www.shioka.net/

    [ Photo: Masatoshi Kaga ]

    Shioka Okamoto specializes in research and production in textile design. She graduated from Tama Art University with a major in textile design in 2013 and moved to Europe, where she graduated from Chelsea College of Arts Graduate Diploma Interior Design in 2014 and completed Royal Danish Academy MA Textile Design in 2016. Since 2017, she has been working as an assistant professor at the Faculty of Design, Okayama Prefectural University. She has been working on creating works inspired by existing spaces and places, participating in group exhibitions in Japan and abroad, and presenting her works in solo exhibitions. In her collaborative research “Sensory Pleasure” with Usui Orimono Co., Ltd. she has developed a textile design that makes effective use of discarded polyester crepe.
    http://www.shioka.net/

    [ Photo: Masatoshi Kaga ]

  • Sara Robertson

    Smart Textile Designer

    Dr Sara Robertson is Tutor (Research) in Smart Textiles on the MA Textiles Programme at the RCA and leads the specialism Soft Systems. She also runs a business Sara + Sarah Smart Textile Design with long standing collaborator Sarah Taylor. Their work focusses on transforming textile properties through existing manufacturing capability within the UK. We work with the aesthetic, material and programmable properties of smart textiles and explore markets and creative opportunities for their use beyond wearables. Working closely with MYB Textiles a world leading lace manufacturer based in Scotland they have developed large scale light emitting lace and a prototype control interface for theatre and performance industries.
    https://www.rca.ac.uk/more/staff/dr-sara-robertson/

    Dr Sara Robertson is Tutor (Research) in Smart Textiles on the MA Textiles Programme at the RCA and leads the specialism Soft Systems. She also runs a business Sara + Sarah Smart Textile Design with long standing collaborator Sarah Taylor. Their work focusses on transforming textile properties through existing manufacturing capability within the UK. We work with the aesthetic, material and programmable properties of smart textiles and explore markets and creative opportunities for their use beyond wearables. Working closely with MYB Textiles a world leading lace manufacturer based in Scotland they have developed large scale light emitting lace and a prototype control interface for theatre and performance industries.
    https://www.rca.ac.uk/more/staff/dr-sara-robertson/

PROJECT TEAM (Organizing Committee)

  • Julia Cassim (FRCA)

    Professor, Kyoto Design Lab, Kyoto Institute of Technology

    Julia studied fine art in the UK and Japan and is an international authority on inclusive design. As arts columnist of The Japan Times from 1984-99, she curated and designed award-winning exhibitions for audiences with visual impairments founding a non-profit organisation to increasing cognitive and physical access to museum collections. In 2000, she initiated the pioneering Challenge Workshops programme at the RCA which brought professional designers with disabled and older people in an inclusive co-design process. It was the subject of an exhibition at the Victoria and Albert Museum in 2010. Julia was included in Design Week’s Hot 50 list of people who had most influenced the design world in 2010. In 2014, she became a Professor at the Kyoto Institute of Technology, charged with setting up KYOTO Design Lab, as a centre for interdisciplinary design and innovation. Two D-Lab Lab projects she directed bringing together science and design won a Dutch Design Award in 2016 while another won the Best Idea award at the 2019 Copenhagen Fashion Film Festival.

    [ Photo: Petr Krejc ]

    Julia studied fine art in the UK and Japan and is an international authority on inclusive design. As arts columnist of The Japan Times from 1984-99, she curated and designed award-winning exhibitions for audiences with visual impairments founding a non-profit organisation to increasing cognitive and physical access to museum collections. In 2000, she initiated the pioneering Challenge Workshops programme at the RCA which brought professional designers with disabled and older people in an inclusive co-design process. It was the subject of an exhibition at the Victoria and Albert Museum in 2010. Julia was included in Design Week’s Hot 50 list of people who had most influenced the design world in 2010. In 2014, she became a Professor at the Kyoto Institute of Technology, charged with setting up KYOTO Design Lab, as a centre for interdisciplinary design and innovation. Two D-Lab Lab projects she directed bringing together science and design won a Dutch Design Award in 2016 while another won the Best Idea award at the 2019 Copenhagen Fashion Film Festival.

    [ Photo: Petr Krejc ]

  • Kaori Ueda

    Associate professor, Kyoto Saga University of Arts

    Based in Kyoto, Kaori Ueda is textile designer and researcher specializing in weaving and Associate Professor at Kyoto Saga University of Arts. A graduate of the  Royal College of Art (RCA) in 2007, she returned to  Japan and began researching traditional textile design here.
    Her research is practice-based rather than theoretical using actual design methods drawn from evidence in historic books and materials.  She has recreated Old chirimen fabric to compare its quality with current chirimen fabric and show its material qualities outside its usual cultural context of the kimono.
    Her other interest is in loom history and the differences between the European Jacquard and those used in Japan for traditional clothing.
    https://www.kyoto-saga.ac.jp/about/teachers/2156

    [ Photo: Masaki Kawabata]

    Based in Kyoto, Kaori Ueda is textile designer and researcher specializing in weaving and Associate Professor at Kyoto Saga University of Arts. A graduate of the  Royal College of Art (RCA) in 2007, she returned to  Japan and began researching traditional textile design here.
    Her research is practice-based rather than theoretical using actual design methods drawn from evidence in historic books and materials.  She has recreated Old chirimen fabric to compare its quality with current chirimen fabric and show its material qualities outside its usual cultural context of the kimono.
    Her other interest is in loom history and the differences between the European Jacquard and those used in Japan for traditional clothing.
    https://www.kyoto-saga.ac.jp/about/teachers/2156

    [ Photo: Masaki Kawabata]

  • Tomohiro Inoue

    KYOTO Design Lab, Kyoto Institute of Technology / FABLAB Kitakagaya

    Tomohiro Inoue teaches digital fabrication to citizens at FABLAB Kitakagaya. His main area of activity is making things and creating things using digital fabrication, and he is developing a movement to promote the makers movement so that it does not become a transient movement.
    https://fablabkitakagaya.org/
    YouFab Global Creative Awards 2015 FINALISTS

    Tomohiro Inoue teaches digital fabrication to citizens at FABLAB Kitakagaya. His main area of activity is making things and creating things using digital fabrication, and he is developing a movement to promote the makers movement so that it does not become a transient movement.
    https://fablabkitakagaya.org/
    YouFab Global Creative Awards 2015 FINALISTS

  • Kosuke Kinoshita

    Loftwork Inc. / MTRL・FabCafe Kyoto Marketing and Produce

    Kosuke Kinoshita has been involved in “MTRL (Material)”, which supports co-creation and innovation of manufacturing companies using materials as a starting point, and “FabCafe Kyoto”, a community base where various creators, researchers, and companies gather with the keywords of technology and creation, since its launch. Through online/offline workshop management and exhibition planning production, he is practising “creating a place where chemical reactions occur” and “designing contexts that connect things from different fields.
    https://loftwork.com/jp/people/kousuke_kinoshita

    Kosuke Kinoshita has been involved in “MTRL (Material)”, which supports co-creation and innovation of manufacturing companies using materials as a starting point, and “FabCafe Kyoto”, a community base where various creators, researchers, and companies gather with the keywords of technology and creation, since its launch. Through online/offline workshop management and exhibition planning production, he is practising “creating a place where chemical reactions occur” and “designing contexts that connect things from different fields.
    https://loftwork.com/jp/people/kousuke_kinoshita

  • Junya Iida

    Loftwork Inc.
    Creative Director

    After working as an engineer for a semiconductor company for eight years, Junya Iida moved to the UK to study art and design. He graduated from Central Saint Martins College of Arts and Design in London with a degree in Graphic Design. After returning to Japan, he worked as a graphic designer at SANDWICH, an art, architecture, and design company, before joining Loftwork in 2018.

    After working as an engineer for a semiconductor company for eight years, Junya Iida moved to the UK to study art and design. He graduated from Central Saint Martins College of Arts and Design in London with a degree in Graphic Design. After returning to Japan, he worked as a graphic designer at SANDWICH, an art, architecture, and design company, before joining Loftwork in 2018.

  • An Kato

    Loftwork Inc.
    Creative Director

    Born in Aichi Prefecture. Graduated from Nagoya University of Arts. My research theme at university was “Body and Clothing”.
    Also involved in planning exhibitions and campus renovation projects.

    In 2021, I experienced the power of creativity through an internship at FabCafe Nagoya. Seeking to encounter new values created by various fields and creativity, she joined Loftwork.

    Born in Aichi Prefecture. Graduated from Nagoya University of Arts. My research theme at university was “Body and Clothing”.
    Also involved in planning exhibitions and campus renovation projects.

    In 2021, I experienced the power of creativity through an internship at FabCafe Nagoya. Seeking to encounter new values created by various fields and creativity, she joined Loftwork.

Information

Date & Time

Mon, August 22, 2022 – Mon, October 10, 2022 18:30 – 20:00 every Monday in Japan time UTC+09:00

Venue

Online Session

Fee

JPY 25,000 (incl. tax) / 1 person English interpretation will be provided for Japanese lectures.

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